Sunday, February 24, 2008

CORPORATE MIND CONTROL? Subliminal McDonald's ad on Food Network

Someone was taping "Iron Chef America" when they noticed their screen flash red. When they went back to roll the tape it was, they found a McDonald's ad on just one frame! What's happening here? See the video for yourself.

CORPORATE MIND CONTROL - Hidden Messages In Tv Shows by: J. Mark Soveign
Is the Food Network using mind control techniques on us? The TvSquad.com website is running a story about a MacDonald's ad that was inserted for only 1/30th of a second in an episode of Iron Chef America. The story discloses: "A YouTube video featuring a "single frame" shot from a McDonald's ad in the middle of Food Network's Iron Chef has some convinced that the company is sneaking subliminal messages into the network's programming." View there story here:
http://www.tvsquad.com/2007/01/22/subliminal-mcdonalds-ad-on-food-network-video/
At present no one seems to know how or why this happened. Mind control conspiracy buffs are bound to point to this as an example of how they are right - that corporations are using Tv ads in conjunction with their long-standing habit of weaving messages and codes into their commercial logos and print advertising in order to control out behavior.
The 1957 book "Hidden Persuaders", authored by Vance Packard explored the use of consumer motivational research and other psychological techniques, including depth psychology and subliminal tactics, by advertisers to manipulate expectations and induce desire for products, particularly in the American postwar era.
Don't Sell The Steak, Sell The Sizzle
People need to know if subtle manipulation of consumer behavior like the above MacDonald's ad works. In the early 1950's conventional supermarket research indicated that ready-to-bake cake mixes would be a good seller, but the weren't. Focus groups set up to study the problem revealed that women liked the idea behind the ease of use of the product, but felt guilty that they were serving their family something that was less than "authentic". The solution? Betty Crocker changed the baking instructions on the box by adding just three words: "add one egg" and nothing else. Sales of boxed cake mixes skyrocketed.
You see a video showing the flash MacDonald's ad and decide for yourself why it's in there. Bon Appetit!


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